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Saturday, September 26, 2020

 A Review of. . .


Promises

Captain Mara – Bruce – Lee is a natural pilot, skilled and experienced enough to teach others how to handle one of the most finickity aircraft there is; the Huey helicopter. The mere fact that she finds herself more than a century into the future and in an entirely different star system hasn’t altered her vocation one bit. Except that now, instead of foreign students, she’s required to teach SpinDogs how to fly, thereby building a bridge between the two communities that will contribute to the success of future Lost Soldier missions on R’Bak.

Something essential to everyone’s continued survival.

However, Mara is riddled with guilt at being wrenched away from her husband and son. And though they are now long dead, she still harbors a deep and aching bitterness toward her circumstances. That bitterness results in her cutting off her feelings, so that she is no longer able to form attachments that others take for granted.

Until her latest student, that is.

For though Ozendi is from an alien community, he reminds her enough of her husband that she’s overwhelmed by long-suppressed emotions, and struggles to know how to respond . . . if at all. With good reason! There’s one hell of a lot at stake. If she breaks the trust of her superiors and puts the finely-balanced relationship with the SpinDogs in jeopardy, it could spell disaster for everyone.

So what to do?

Promises is a superb reminder that, it’s not only men who march off to war. And though they may be feminine in nature, women also struggle with the very real crutch that can bring anyone to their knees. That of fomenting grief and anger. Yes, mental and emotional scars can be just as debilitating as bullet wounds. And this story balances that lesson quite nicely.

See my Amazon Review Here:

Amazon



Saturday, September 19, 2020

This week's review of. . .


Diablo – The Veiled Prophet

The demon-backed Triune has been vanquished. Now, all that stands between Uldyssian, his edyrem, and outright victory over evil is the Cathedral of Light and its charismatic leader – the fallen angel Inarius – who hides in plain sight, using the guise of a youthful Prophet.

However, Uldyssian is unaware of the aid bestowed upon him and his followers by the angel in his quest so far. As such, they have grown overconfident in their invulnerability, and are blind to the fact that they are being manipulated. Something has to give. But what?

The edyrem are oblivious to the consequences of submitting to their unrestrained passions in battle. Inarius is intent on retaining power, and would willingly allow Sanctuary to be destroyed rather than lose face. Ever ready to seize the advantage, the demon lords bide their time, just waiting for the scales to tip in their favor. Worse still, the heavenly host has discovered the location of Sanctuary and one of the Angiris Council is, even now, confirming his worst suspicions before calling in the High Heavens to act.

As I said: Something’s got to give.

What that is, exactly, you can discover for yourself in a helter-skelter ride of an adventure that is as action-packed as it is riddled with subterfuge and subtext. Even better, it’s also a story of personal growth, acceptance, and sacrifice.

No, you can’t always have a happy ending. But then again, don’t the best stories always end with a little dash of poignant self-discovery?

A thoroughly enjoyable conclusion to the Sin War. (Now – play the game!)




Sunday, September 6, 2020

My Review of. . .



Diablo – Scales of the Serpent
In the “Scales of the Serpent”, the second of the Sin War trilogy, we find our protagonist, Uldyssian – reluctant hero of the people – hell-bent on destroying the cult of the Triune, a religious movement that has been skillfully subverted to the demoness, Lilith’s, cause.
And with good reason.
The world in which our story is set, Sanctuary, is the conjugation of rebel demons and angels alike. And Lilith was one of those who championed its creation. She, along with her lover and co-conspirator, the angel Inarius, have fought for millennium to keep the existence of Sanctuary a secret from the Burning Hell and the High Heavens, who would destroy it in an instant if they realized the power some of the mortals like Uldyssian – known as naphalem – possess.
The thing is, Lilith is out to upset the balance, and not only seeks to preserve Sanctuary’s integrity, but is determined to establish herself as the Supreme Being of a new order.
But at what cost?
Hundreds of the naphalem have fallen. Mendeln, Uldyssian’s brother, becomes ever more entwined by the necromantic powers that have been offered him by the first of the naphalem, Rathma. And Achilos is dead, though bound to act as champion and defender to Serenthia and Uldyssian against his wishes. How will anything ever be the same again?
Here’s a clue . . . it won’t!
As before, Uldyssian’s habit of self-doubt – despite the miracles he’s responsible for – and disbelieving the obvious become rather irksome as the story progresses. However, that doesn’t detract from the action – and there’s plenty of it – when the Triune, and Lilith, realize what he’s up to.
Overall, “Scales of the Serpent” is a pleasing journey through the world of Sanctuary, and has me hooked enough to want to know how the story ends.