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Saturday, August 22, 2020

A Review of. . .



Diablo – Birthright
I’ve never played the games on which the Sin War trilogy is based, but I do enjoy a good story. And where Richard A. Knaak is concerned, THAT’s what you know you’re gonna get.
Uldyssian Ul-Diomed is just a normal guy. A farmer, living with his brother in the village of Seram. Life is hard, but he’s quite content with his lot and is good at what he does. Those who know Uldyssian view him as a no-nonsense individual who can be trusted to deal fairly with those he encounters. Because of this, he’s well respected by his peers . . . until the fateful day religious zealots come to town.
Uldyssian can’t stand the hypocrisy that seems to surround anyone who pushes their beliefs in his face. So, when members of the two main faiths wind up dead, suspicion turns his way. He flees his homeland, determined to prove his innocence, one way or the other. The only problem with that is he seems to be developing strange new powers. Powers that no normal man should possess.
These events combine, slowly peeling away the fa├žade that has been put in place to keep the populace fooled. Yes, there’s much more to the land in which they live than people realize. And finding out about it can prove deadly . . . as Uldyssian finds out to his cost.
This was my introduction to the world of Sanctuary, and I have to say, I was thoroughly absorbed from the outset. Diablo – Birthright, is an engaging, fast-paced tale that will appeal to a wide audience, and draw you in to Uldyssian’s plight as if he was your best friend gone awry. (Despite his penchant for procrastinating). Nonetheless, it’s a great start. I look forward to more.

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Friday, August 7, 2020

My latest Review Of. . .

 

The Star Seeds of Earth

Alibi Jones is something of a maverick.

Son of the infamous Vatican Assassin, Bernard Campion, and a mother from whom he is estranged, Alibi likes to keep to himself, running an isolated outpost in a remote part of space away from the regimented regulations imposed by the Solar Alliance, and the draconian orderliness of the Greater Tah.

Unfortunately, Alibi gets restless. A lot. And that restlessness leads him into all sorts of trouble.

Take this latest escapade, for example. Alibi is tasked to find a Star Seed on behalf of an “interested party.” The trouble is, Star Seeds aren’t just harmless curios that happen to demand a high price. Oh no. They’re primeval artifacts containing the scientific and biological repository of the Ancient Enemy; a civilization that once used their superior technology and mental powers to dominate all other life in the cosmos until one day, millions of years ago, those races rose up to defy their masters and wipe them out.

Foreseeing such an outcome, the Ancient Enemy scattered their potential throughout the universe. And in the countless millennia since then, the most advanced of those liberated alien cultures used their arts and fortitude to hunt down and eradicate every Star Seed they could find; for once opened, they would be capable of altering the biota of an entire planet to resurrect the Ancients once more.

And Alibi’s been asked to use his skills to find one. The thing is, why? Who on Earth would dare such a thing? What would be the implications of such a device being activated, even if it ended up in the hands of scientists with altruistic intent, let alone those with ulterior motives?

Well, we certainly find out in a complex and intricately interwoven tale of high adventure, personal discovery and betrayal, political intrigue, and narcissistic ambition that will keep you engaged and entertained from beginning to end. And what I particularly enjoyed about the Star Seeds of Earth was that fact that, not only was it easy to read, but it was downright fun! What more could you ask for?